Archive for tourist

Tropical Shark = Hawaiian Crunch

Posted in Classic Horror, Giant Monsters, Nature Gone Wild, Sharks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on November 25, 2016 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Up From The Depths

“There are no sharks in the Hawaiian archipelago!,” screams a tropical hotel resort manager as his guests are being systematically eaten by a shark.

But it’s not just any shark — this tourist trapper is a prehistoric shark, theorized to be let loose by an underwater earthquake. So believes the sea biologist, who later provides Up From The Depths’ (1979) funniest moment. Besides all the other ones, that is.

Up From The Depths

Boaters, swimmers, divers and dumbasses are being attacked by said prehistoric predator, which isn’t much bigger than Jaws’ cousin’s neighbor’s BFF. One second you’re there, the next, nothing but red, foamy bubbles. After a broad daylight attack, everybody leaves the water and runs back and forth on the beach, screaming and knocking over stuff. Then night falls. And the tourists are still screaming and running back and forth, knocking down stuff.

Up From The Depths

A reward for the monster is offered: a case of island rum. And to sweeten the pot (as if it was needed), the hotel manager throws in $1,000 bucks and a stay in the presidential suite. Well, dang — somebody hand me a spear!

Up From The Depths

The shark makes blurry cameos and his meals are about as graphic as watching somebody sloppily eating tomato soup. The aforementioned hilarity includes three drunk guys on a boat prepping a blow torch to go after the shark. (Flames under water — why didn’t I think of that?) They end up turning their pleasure craft into a roaring campfire.

Up From The Depths

But the best LOL moment comes when the sea biologist barely makes it back aboard the boat after being attacked by the shark. In order to lure the beast out into the open, they tie a line around him, who just died from his injuries, and toss him into the drink. Then they tow his body back and forth in front of the hotel in front of the still screaming guests. What some people won’t do for rum.

Up From The Depths

Plastic explosives are found, words were said, shark goes boom, all without actually seeing barely more than a dorsal fin and an occasional toothy smile. (Hawaiian sharks, like the islanders, are so pleasant.)

If you’re looking for one of the worst Jaws (1978) knock-offs ever made, you just found it.

Monsters = Monster Money

Posted in Nature Gone Wild with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 13, 2016 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Loch Ness Monster

My secretary (me) came across an AFP article posted 4/13/16 (today if you’re reading this today) that a marine robot deployed in the Scotland’s Loch Ness has found the remains of a monster, but that it turned out to be a prop from a movie shot in 1970.

Loch Ness Monster

This DOES NOT mean the Loch Ness Monster isn’t still patrolling the Loch for tourist dollars. (VisitScotland.com estimates the revenue generated by tourists hoping to catch a glimpse of “Nessie” at £60 million ($76 million euros/ $85 million fins a year. Ask members of Scotland’s Chamber of Commerce if they believe Nessie is real, and they’ll show you their bank balance.)

Loch Ness Monster

The marine robot belongs to the Norwegian offshore oil company Kongsberg Maritime, who is mapping the depths of the Loch (775 feet deep – big enough for a hundred Loch Ness Monsters) in a project named “Operation Groundtruth.” Good branding – they should be able to prove Nessie’s existance with a name like that.

Loch Ness Monster

“Although it is the shape of Nessie, it is not the remains of the monster that has mystified the world for 80 years,” Scottish tourism agency VisitScotland, which is backing the project. “The blurry object with a long neck was a 30-foot long model of the monster made for the film The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes, directed by Billy Wilder. It is thought the model sank after its humps were removed (the buoyancy was in the humps) never to be seen again. The monster was actually a submarine in the film.”

Loch Ness Monster

That’s pretty dang cool. But Nessie – the REAL one – is cooler. If only the marine robot could get a pic of Nessie together with its movie stunt stand-in.

Headless Dead Head

Posted in Classic Horror, Ghosts, Scream Queens with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 25, 2015 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

The Headless Ghost

In 1959’s The Headless Ghost, a sexy exchange student from Sweden is talked into spending the night in a haunted British castle with two American boy exchange students to see if the dump is actually haunted, or if it’s just a tourist angle. Swedish chicks will fall for any pick-up line.

The Headless Ghost

The castle turns out to be bedeviled, but by a ghost who is so friendly you want to hang out and drink ale with the polterguy. Seems there’s a problem, though; Another ghost – a duke of some sort with a royal pedigree – has lost his head and he can’t find it. (It’s probably out in the barn where undead farm animals are eating his brains and… Sorry, I lost my head for a moment.)

The Headless Ghost

So no-head ghost has to walk the castle between the living and the not, until such a time when his severed skull can be returned to its rightful owner and he can go to Hell like the rest of us.

The Headless Ghost

There’s another problem. A third ghost doesn’t want them to find the second ghost’s face. Sounds cool on paper, but this is really cheesy teen scream stuff, with no screaming to scream of. In other words, too much talking and not enough head losing. And since when does a ghost movie end happily? I thought there were rules about that.

The Headless Ghost

So exactly how did the ghost become headless? Best guess is that he was running with scissors. That, or he tripped and fell on a guillotine.