Archive for serpent

Cartoon Zombies, Tent Snakes, Slenderman’s Cousin

Posted in Asian Horror, Asian Sci-Fi, Evil, Foreign Horror, Ghosts, Nature Gone Wild, Science Fiction, Scream Queens, Slashers, Zombies with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 26, 2017 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Seoul Station

Read a press statement that the advanced screening for the new Wonder Woman movie was for women only — no dudes allowed. You can bet your U by Kotex Barely There® Thong Panty Liners that if the situation were reversed, girls would be screaming bloody murder.

While you ponder that, here are a few upcoming horror/sci-fi movies — allowed to be read by women AND men — while I go outside and scream bloody murder…

SEOUL STATION (May 30, 2017/iTunes)
“As the sun sets around Seoul Station, an old man thought to have died sinks his teeth into the warm flesh of a homeless person. Soon, the streets are filled with vicious zombies desperate to feed. Hae-sun, a runaway, witnesses the frightening sight while her father Suk-gyu and boyfriend desperately search for her. As the attacked become the attackers, the government declares a lock out of the station, leaving the uninfected to struggle desperately against the dangerous undead. With zombie numbers exploding, people without a home to return to, now have to flee without a place to run to in order to survive.”

This is an animated (or “cartoon”) prequel to Train To Busan, 2016’s best zombie movie. Haven’t seen TtB yet? How dare you? It’s on Netflix™ and various other viewable platforms. I prefer to view it from the platform of my couch.

Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter

ROGUE WARRIOR: ROBOT FIGHTER (June 2, 2017)
“In the distant future, artificial intelligence rules Earth, but one woman has a plan to find a mythical weapon that represents humanity’s only hope of salvation.”

Actually, she has two mythical weapons. Don’t make me explain this.

Don’t Hang Up

DON’T HANG UP (June 12, 2017/UK, June 26, 2017/US)
“Following a long tradition of cocky teenage boys with too much time on their hands, Brady, Sam, and Mosley like to amuse themselves by making prank calls. However, their cellular diversions are intensified by the extreme nature of the pranks they put their unsuspecting victims through, and the delight and encouragement they receive when they post videos of their hijinks online for maximum humiliation. Having pushed the wrong person too far, they find themselves on the other side of a call, and an evening intended for normal high school revelry turns increasingly bloody as their unknown assailant ramps up a prank of his own.”

Ugh — more social media teen horror. With a plot of borrows (or “steals”) from a dozen other movies, I bet they made it for $1. Hope they double their money at the box office.

Better Watch Out

BETTER WATCH OUT (October 6, 2017/Limited)
“On a quiet suburban street tucked within a ‘safe neighborhood’, a babysitter must defend a twelve-year-old boy from strangers breaking into the house, only to discover that this is far from a normal home invasion.”

This one’s also being called Safe Neighborhood. Neither title works, so might I suggest, Home Alone.

Serpent

SERPENT (2017)
“A husband and wife on a romantic escape out in the wild quickly turns deadly when they are trapped in a tent with a poisonous snake.”

Pfffft — she didn’t call it poisonous on their honeymoon.

Flay

FLAY (2017)
“An estranged daughter who, after the death of her mother, struggles to save her brother and those around her from a malevolent faceless spirit.”

Slenderman called and he wants his faceless face back.

Kudzu Zombies

KUDZU ZOMBIES (2017)
“Lonnie must lead a mismatched group of survivors to the local air strip to escape a deadly zombie horde after an experimental chemical enters the food chain, transforming the citizens of Charleston, MS into monsters.”

Spoiler: the “experimental chemical” was chipotle and it was used illegally on a hamburger instead of a taco. And the zombies aren’t monsters but rather p*ssed off fast food customers wanting their $1.99 (plus tax) refunded in full.

Creatures Sharing Features

Posted in Nature Gone Wild, Science Fiction, Scream Queens, TV Vixens with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 3, 2015 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Indigenous

Ardent fan of creature features. Think it has something to do with alcohol. I’m a big fan of that as well. So imagine my inebriated glee to see two new “nature gone wild” horror movies headed towards my bar stool: Indigenous – a take on the Chupacabra legend (at least I think that’s what it is), and Gitaskog, a fishy horned serpent (at least I think that’s what it is).

Gitaskog

Curiously, both movies (release dates pending) share distinctive (i.e., photocopied) ingredients, the first of which is the employment of folklore creatures. But there’s more than that. You may proceed…

Indigenous: “Five friends travel from Los Angeles to exotic Panama for a week of partying in the lush tropical paradise…”

Gitaskog: “Five friends embark on a camping trip to sacred Native territory…”

Indigenous: “They learn of a secret jungle hike to a pristine waterfall nearby and are cautioned strongly against the hike, warning that other gringos in search of the legendary waterfall had mysteriously disappeared into the jungle, never to be seen or heard from again. Ignoring the warnings…”

Gitaskog: “They are warned to stay away. When they choose to ignore the warning…”

Indigenous

Indigenous: “As night closes in, the friends realize too late the truth behind the warnings – horrific, bloodthirsty, flesh-eating creatures are now stalking them…”

Gitaskog: “They are confronted with strange occurrences, seductive apparitions, vengeful locals and a deadly behemoth. Their weekend of fun becomes a descent into Hell…”

Gitaskog

It appears both movies were written by the same person. I care not, because hey – creatures! And we all know what goes good with creaturesalcohol, an ingredient necessary for the betterment of every horror movie.

Feeding Formula To Snakes

Posted in Asian Horror, Asian Sci-Fi, Foreign Horror, Giant Monsters, Nature Gone Wild with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 26, 2014 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Thunder of Gigantic Serpent

This sounds like a bar joke: What do you get when you cross a giant snake with a little Asian girl, some terrorists and a lavish movie budget of about $300? You get Daai se wong (1988), aka Thunder of Gigantic Serpent. You also get one heckuva hot giant monster mess.

Thunder of Gigantic Serpent

The aforementioned little girl finds some secret formula that makes animals and plants grow to one billion times their metric body mass, and feeds her pet snake a mouthful. You know how emotionally attached Timmy was to Lassie? Those two have nothing on Ting Ting (that’s what it sounded like when her parents yelled at her) and Mozla, a snake the size of half a hula-hoop. The darn thing actually understands her and nods when she talks incessantly to it. This gets really old.

Gigantic Serpent

Meanwhile, criminal terrorists who shoot scientists and use the “F” word, want that formula. Why? To take over the world, of course. They know the formula works, but haven’t seen how well as Mozla, growing like a Happy Hour bathroom line, hasn’t made his grand appearance just yet. He has to wait until the terrorists kidnap their girl in order to put the squeeze on ‘em.

Thunder of Gigantic Serpent

Ninety percent of the movie is spent watching terrorists chase and being chased by bullets and swear words. When Ting Ting is captured and spirited away to a tall building and starts screaming INCESSANTLY for Mozla to save her, the serpent actually hears the paint-peeling cries and carves gigantic paths of destruction to find her. And because Mozla is now the size of a building, wrapping himself around one makes sense. It also make it a lot easier for the military to fire about 30 missiles to make him let go. I’ll say this for Mozla – he’s one tough worm.

Thunder of Gigantic Serpent

Ting Ting cries hysterically at her fallen phallic symbol, who symbolically shrinks to a third of his size after the job is done. All of this sounds vaguely familiar. I must’ve seen it in another movie or heard about it in a locker room.