Archive for lycanthropy

Doctor to the Monsters

Posted in Classic Horror, Evil, Science Fiction, Vampires, Werewolves, Zombies with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 30, 2016 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

House of Dracula

House of Dracula (1945) is the cash-in sequel to House of Frankenstein (1944). Sadly, Co-op of The Creature and Duplex of the Damned never got off the drawing board. Dang it all to heck.

House of Dracula

In HoD, Dracula (aka, Baron Latos) is fed up with being a vampire and seeks the medical acumen of castle-dwelling Dr. Franz Edelmann. No word on whether or not Dracula got a referral from his primary care physician.

House of Dracula

Doc Edelmann, aided by two nurse assistants (one is a supermodel, the other a hunchback who looked like she just had her bra on backward), tells Dracula that he’s been experimenting with clavaria formosa, a plant whose spores have the ability to reshape bone. (Sorry skeletons; doesn’t work on you.) And with a series of blood transfusions, he can cure the quitter vampire. (P.S. The blood comes from Edelmann himself. Put that up there in the Top 5 malpractices suits of all time.)

House of Dracula

The doc must’ve left his “walk-ins welcome” sign on because Larry Talbot – the Wolf Man – also shows up, begging the doc to find a cure for his lycanthropy. (Geez, who’s next – the Mummy needing his Band-Aids™ changed?)

House of Dracula

As we all know, Talbot hates being a werewolf because of all that primal need to kill stuff. The doc theorizes that Larry’s wolf-y upgrade is not due to the moon’s influence, but there’s pressure on his brain that, with a little open head surgery and some science mold spores from the same plant, he can cure the fur.

House of Dracula

Of course, all of this goes to heck in a hand basket. During the transfusion, Dracula punks the doc and Nurse Hunchback by hypnotizing them and reversing the blood flow, thereby infecting Edelmann with Type-Oh No Negative. Now the doc’s a vampire that runs around town making work for the coroner.

House of Dracula

Somehow they wedge Frankenstein’s monster into the mix. Why not? In for a penny, in for a pound. While F’s monster doesn’t really do anything except lumber around like it was last call, it’s the now evil doc who needs to taste the wrath of torches and rakes wielded by hangman jury-esque villagers.

House of Dracula

Dracula, wearing a top hat indoors (how rude), is hammy and seems to be phoning it in. Larry Talbot sports a mustache (like he freakin’ needs more hair on his face). The doc – in both care giver and care taker form – gets most of the screen time (and will no doubt bill you for it). The hunchback nurse is killed and her body tossed in a cave hole. (I had a hunch that would happen. Heh.) And Frankenstein’s monster, who locked it up with Larry in Frankenstein Meets The Wolf Man (1943), gets the raw end of the electrode YET AGAIN, and goes up in flames with the rest of the castle in the movie’s rushed climax/ending. He’ll be back.

House of Frankenstein / House of the Wolf Man

P.S. Wolf Man and Frankenstein’s M were reunited in 2009’s House of the Wolf Man. Those two just can’t seem to get along. Maybe they should try regular therapy instead of shock therapy.

The Devil’s Hound

Posted in Nature Gone Wild, Scream Queens, TV Vixens, Werewolves with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 3, 2014 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Werewolf: The Devil’s Hound

The DVD cover says this 2007 movie is called Werewolf: The Devil’s Hound. The directors who made it call it Lycan. Pick a neck and bite it, people.

Almost as if making it up on the spot, the script goes from serious werewolvery to slapstick comedy. Not sure either works, but I was duly entertained by the artful graphic gore. Less so by the plot/dialogue.

Werewolf: The Devil’s Hound

A female werewolf shows up in a crate of fireworks and gets loose into the general public with the intent to start a family (i.e., have fuzzy sex). A pyrotechnician gets his hand bitten by the she-wolf and incrementally changes into one himself, much in the same fashion Jack Nicholson did in Wolf (1994).

Werewolf: The Devil’s Hound

The female werewolf runs on all fours but attacks on two legs. She’s covered in long white hair and her face is all squinched up as though she just drank some Zima™. In human form she’s a second date worthy redhead with a wincing foreign accent. Alas, she does not “de-fur,” if you know what I mean.

Werewolf: The Devil’s Hound

The comedy bits border on annoying (just like me after one or nine beers), but the production values are fairly accomplished for having a budget of my paycheck before that asshook FICA dude gets its hairy paws on it.

Red-Headed Werewolf

Posted in Classic Horror, Giant Monsters, Nature Gone Wild, Scream Queens, Werewolves with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 25, 2014 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Ginger Snaps Back: The Beginning

A prequel (but third in the series), Ginger Snaps Back: The Beginning (2004) snaps back in time to show where the Fitzgerald sister’s lycanthropic (sorry – word of the day calendar) lineage began its bloody tale/tail/trail.

Ginger Snaps Back: The Beginning

Wandering on horseback through the snowy woods in the early 19th Century (yes, they had snow back then), Ginger and Brigitte come across the aftermath of a werewolf rampage with blood and gunk everywhere. They’re found by an Indian who takes them to the improvised-fortified Fort Baily, a trading outpost (d.b.a., Northern Region Trading Company). That there are deep claw marks on the outer walls suggests something was trying to get in without permission.

Ginger Snaps Back: The Beginning

The fort is occupied by a handful of men, including a doctor who has a practical approach to determining if you’re a werewolf, an uptight military guy who doesn’t brush his teeth but wants to shoot everybody in the face, and a preacher who wants to burn the girls at the stake because they’re tempting to the flesh (duh).

Ginger Snaps Back: The Beginning

Aside from all that stuff, life at Fort About To Be Eaten just doesn’t seem right. This is probably due to the nightly werewolf attacks. The preacher, wanting to purge the fort of its sins, lets a werewolf in and traps it with the sisters. Barely escaping, Ginger, the hot red-head sister, is later bitten by a child werewolf hidden in the fort’s happy walls. Then the real fun starts.

Ginger Snaps Back: The Beginning

More intense confrontations with the stressed-out fort dwellers, more werewolf attacks (i.e., neck-biting/face-ripping), and the growing of fur where there was no fur before. The final werewolf siege is pretty dang hairy (ahem), but it’s the showdown between Ginger – now well on her way to needing a shave – and the bully army guy that’s the icing on this hair cake.

A cool original take on the werewolf theme. And hey, the werewolves themselves don’t look like Halloween rental costumes. If they were gonna screw up this flick, that would’ve been the point to do so.