Archive for folklore

Day-glo Ogre

Posted in Asian Horror, Asian Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Foreign Horror with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 7, 2015 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Legend of Ogre

When one thinks of an ogre, it’s usually visualized as something that looks like a WWE wrestler after he’s lived in a garbage landfill for years, while wearing a diaper made out of a bear. It might also have one or fewer eyes and a Fred Flintstone club for hitting diaper-providing bears.

The ogre, though, in Legend of Ogre (aka, Kijo Densetsu/2003) is a young Japanese girl with hot pink long hair, a gray complexion and dressed in pajamas three sizes too big. Worse, the story about the punk rock ogre unleashing hell is as lame as the fake wig she wears.

Two high school girls and their female teacher go to a village out in the woods to study regional folklore. Their cell phones don’t work that far into the woods. Right outta the gate – BIG problems. Upon arriving, a screamy old woman runs up to them and speaking louder than normal, starts yelling “Ominous, ominous!” I don’t know what that means. Staying in a vacant house the girls snoop around and open a storehouse, which unleashes unimaginable horrors and…uh, yeah – not even close.

Kijo Densetsu

The pink-haired woman was locked up (or “imprisoned”) in the storehouse, even though she saved the village from a red dragon (told, not shown) many moons ago. Now that she’s free to model her pajamas, there’s much ominous-ing to get caught up on.

The teacher dies, as did my patience for something cool to happen. (I actually fell into a deeper sleep twice while napping through the tedious non-action.) Legend of Ogre was made with one of those consumer digital video cameras, so it looks like your neighbor filmed it. From the half-baked storyline to the day-glo hair, everyone needs to go back in the storehouse and reflect on what they’ve done.

Mothman Comes Out Of Mothballs

Posted in Classic Horror, Giant Monsters, Nature Gone Wild, Science Fiction, UFOs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 10, 2015 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Moth

Been a while since we’ve heard from Mothman. Maybe he’s been busy planning to knock down more loaded bridges or scaring the selfies outta teenagers. Regardless, everyone will be able to look MM right in the glowing red eyes when he makes an appearance in his latest found footage star vehicle Moth, due sometime in 2016.

Here’s what’s on the bridge: “An enthusiastic lecturer and her student who travel to Europe to go after the mythology of the Mothman, but they soon have to fight for survival.”

Moth

Okay, penalty flag time. First, Mothman is not from Europe. He’s from Point Pleasant, West Virginia. I know Mothman can fly, but Europe is 4,310 miles away. His wings would get, like, super tired ’n stuff.

Secondly, Mothman is NOT mythology; He’s as real as a UFO.

Thirdly, as this is a found footage flick, the plot (and trailer) looks like it was modeled after The Blair Witch Project (1999), the worst horror movie of all time.

Mothman

Given that, hopefully Moth won’t suck. Until then, watch The Mothman Prophecies (2002) or any myriad of YouTube™ documentaries/real found footage for some sweet Moth-y action.

Creatures Sharing Features

Posted in Nature Gone Wild, Science Fiction, Scream Queens, TV Vixens with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 3, 2015 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Indigenous

Ardent fan of creature features. Think it has something to do with alcohol. I’m a big fan of that as well. So imagine my inebriated glee to see two new “nature gone wild” horror movies headed towards my bar stool: Indigenous – a take on the Chupacabra legend (at least I think that’s what it is), and Gitaskog, a fishy horned serpent (at least I think that’s what it is).

Gitaskog

Curiously, both movies (release dates pending) share distinctive (i.e., photocopied) ingredients, the first of which is the employment of folklore creatures. But there’s more than that. You may proceed…

Indigenous: “Five friends travel from Los Angeles to exotic Panama for a week of partying in the lush tropical paradise…”

Gitaskog: “Five friends embark on a camping trip to sacred Native territory…”

Indigenous: “They learn of a secret jungle hike to a pristine waterfall nearby and are cautioned strongly against the hike, warning that other gringos in search of the legendary waterfall had mysteriously disappeared into the jungle, never to be seen or heard from again. Ignoring the warnings…”

Gitaskog: “They are warned to stay away. When they choose to ignore the warning…”

Indigenous

Indigenous: “As night closes in, the friends realize too late the truth behind the warnings – horrific, bloodthirsty, flesh-eating creatures are now stalking them…”

Gitaskog: “They are confronted with strange occurrences, seductive apparitions, vengeful locals and a deadly behemoth. Their weekend of fun becomes a descent into Hell…”

Gitaskog

It appears both movies were written by the same person. I care not, because hey – creatures! And we all know what goes good with creaturesalcohol, an ingredient necessary for the betterment of every horror movie.

Boogeyman Comes Out Of The Closet

Posted in Classic Horror, Evil, Fantasy, Ghosts, Slashers with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 23, 2015 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Boogeyman

As a kid Tim saw his dad get taken by the Boogeyman when he was just old enough to be traumatized for life by the unfortunate experience. Tim’s older now and has a girlfriend who puts up with him sleeping on the floor and not having anything stored in closets – except Boogeymen. That’s not good feng-shui.

Tim’s ghost mom tells him to go back to the family home and the scene of the dad-taking. Really good idea. There Tim discovers a history of children being taken by the Boogeyman, him being one if his “protective” dad hadn’t gotten in the way.

Boogeyman

All of this is just an excuse to get Tim to go into the closet, which he does. It acts as a time portal, transporting him back and forth to his old bedroom. Why he didn’t use it to go to the store is a glaring plot hole.

Boogeyman

Solid creep-out moments, including the ghost kid victims of Boogeyman and bathtubs filled with blood instead of hot soapy bubbles and shampoo bottles. Taking it one step further, Boogeyman turns into electricity and possesses toys.

Boogeyman

Through an overly-long set-up, Tim finally grows a sac and throws a solid slobberknocker, sending Boogeyman back to the place of coats, shoe boxes filled with pictures instead of shoes, and some other junk you don’t use anymore. This paves the way for several sequels no one asked for.

Boogeyman (2005) is a sorta nice spin on a fond childhood memory, though B-man should probably stay out of that one box in my closet marked “Evidence.”

Candyman: Bee-Grade Horror

Posted in Classic Horror, Evil, Ghosts, Nature Gone Wild, Slashers with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 26, 2013 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Candyman

Candyman, a former murdered son of a black slave in his pre-folklore days, appears after you look in a mirror and say his name five times. (I tried that using the word “Budweiser™.” Didn’t work.) Those who successfully summon this Man of Candy, always dies an ugly death. Never heard of a pretty death, so that makes sense.

CandymanHelen Lyle is a graduate student researching the legend of Candyman in the sprawling, crime-plagued Cabrini-Green area of town. She meets the real legend who tells her she must believe in him. Hey, any guy with a hook for hand and who shoots bees out of his mouth has my full attention.

Candyman

People become possessed. Dogs get decapitated. Necks get sliced. Blood gets on everything. Bee breath begins to stink. Candyman kidnaps a baby with the intent on not letting it get past Huggies™ and into Underoos™.

Candyman

Helen makes a deal with Candyman – she’ll carry on his fearful legend and make the surrounding neighborhood crap their pants whenever they hear his name, only if he doesn’t take the baby with him into that junk yard bonfire where he lives.

Candyman

Helen barely manages to save the kid from the extra-flame-y flames, and ends up dying due to her burnt-toast flesh. Trevor, Helen’s grief-stricken husband, looks in the mirror, all sad and upside-down smiley, and says his wife’s name five times. Do I have to spell it out for you?

Candyman

A great horror icon in Candyman (1992), what with his happenin’ fur coat, white scarf, hooked hand and mouth bees. He also has a deep voice. I bet he could get a job in radio easy.