Archive for EVP

Ghost Back Talk

Posted in Evil, Ghosts, Science Fiction with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 12, 2015 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Trace

EVP, or “electronic voice phenomena,” is one of those subjective areas wherein ghost hunters on TV visiting allegedly haunted locations yell at the ghost to do or say something. Of course nothing is audible until they play the tape back and the ghost is telling the pesky paranormal investigators to go shove a microphone.

Trace

Trace, a new horror movie dealing with this aural aspect of hauntings, is now available on your platform of choice, and hope to fill your home with the cussing of ghosts:

Trace

“One night at a party, a group of friends experiment with trace phenomena – a form of electronic voice phenomena. However, one by one the friends begin dying and soon realize a door to a horrific realm has been opened. It’s a race against time and demonic forces to sever the transmission save themselves and prevent the demon from entering our world.”

White Noise

For more conversations with the evil and the dead, give White Noise (2005) a visual listen. Or, you could just read my review by clicking this connection to the otherworld. Long distance charges may apply.

 

Ghosts That Give You Static Pt. 2

Posted in Classic Horror, Ghosts, Science Fiction with tags , , , , , , on September 18, 2013 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

White Noise 2: The Light

After having his wife and young son gunned down in front of him while having breakfast in a restaurant (that’s one way of getting out of paying the bill), Abe Dale decides he can’t take the grief after three months and kills himself (booze and pills, not necessarily in that order).

Technically he kills himself. He goes through the dark tunnel with the light at the end (kinda like what a gopher might see waking up on a sunny spring morn) and his dead wife and as equally dead kid are waiting there to greet him. That’s so nice.

White Noise 2: The Light

But thanks to electricity, specifically resuscitation paddles, the doctors are able to bring him back. But Abe is changed: He can see an aura-like light coming out of people about to die. The stronger the light, the sooner they’ll kick the bucket like a soccer ball. Being a good guy, he decides to save them.

White Noise 2: The Light

It works: an old fart about to be run over by a car, a street fight that almost had another guy being tossed off a highway overpass, the cute nurse who waited on him in the hospital (she was in the process of being mugged in the parking garage).

White Noise 2: The Light

Yep, ’ol Abe is a hero now. But there are consequences to interrupting the flow of death. These people were supposed to die. By being Mr. Rescue, he’s paved the way for them to cause even more deaths (i.e., the old fart plows his van into a crowded bus stop). But it gets way more f’d up, and I mean that in a good way. There are several non-predictable, nasty twists that will have you going, “No freakin’ way, man – that is SO messed up!” One scene in particular – in a hotel lobby – is harshly awesome.

White Noise 2: The Light

White Noise 2: The Light (2007) takes its foot off the gas a bit at the end, but that’s small breakfast servings with a side of ammunition as it totally smokes White Noise (2005, sequel by name only.) You’ll have to use your brain on this one, which I was not used to doing. I have to take aspirin as my head always hurts when I think.

Ghosts That Give You Static

Posted in Evil, Ghosts, Science Fiction with tags , , , , , , , on September 17, 2013 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

White Noise

Jonathan Rivers’ (played by Michael Keaton/Batman) new wife gets suspiciously killed right after she tells him she’s pregnant. All consuming grief ensues. Soon thereafter a fat guy comes to Rivers and tells him the deceased wife has been trying to make contact via white noise. (That’s the sound that comes out of most loud women’s mouths).

The man, like me, is an expert on EVP (Electronic Voice Phenomenon), meaning that when a TV channel is set to one of those stations that isn’t broadcasting a televised signal, voices and even images can be heard and seen in MTV-edit snippets.

White Noise

Recorded and freeze-framed, sure enough, Rivers’ wife pops up for a second with a message Jonathan can’t decipher. Her hair looks nice, though. So he buys a bunch of electronic equipment, a bunch of TV sets and recorders and does nothing but sit mindlessly in front of the tube all day. I don’t see what’s wrong with that.

White Noise

Soon, more communications from beyond start coming through. But not all of them are from nice ghosts. There are three gnarly dead things (probably Republicans) that are making people do stuff they more than likely wouldn’t do, like swan dive off of hi-rise apartment balconies.

White Noise

Rivers has to start assembling clues given by his dead wife’s transmissions and sets out to rescue somebody she keeps urging him to save. (She probably told him to take out the trash as well, but that’s in the director’s cut.)

White Noise

White Noise (2005) feels like an extended X-Files episode and kinda starts to go into cool spooky areas. But the last 15 minutes swamp the boat, with the evil trio, commanding a serial killer to do their bidding (the same killer who did in Rivers’ wife), pop out and do a second-rate goofy Casper routine.

Even if you haven’t seen White Noise, you already know how this ultimately ends. And all we’re left with is a bunch of static.