Archive for barn

Udder Horror

Posted in Foreign Horror, Misc. Horror, Nature Gone Wild, Science Fiction with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 7, 2017 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Isolation

Dan Reilly is a farmer. But unlike ’Ol MacDonald, who also had a farm, In Isolation (2005), Dan is severely broke, so he has to rent his cows out for genetic research. That, or lose his late father’s farm, full of knee deep mud and cow poop. (Hey Dan — have you though about growing popcorn trees?)

Isolation

Bovine Genetics Technology has been paying him cash to inject his one of his pregnant cows with a serum that will make them grow faster and produce juicer hamburgers. The opening scene has a research scientist sticking her arm (all the way up to her shoulder) into a cow’s outgoing hay chute. Why, oh why didn’t I turn off the DVD player right then and there?

Isolation

Something bit her hand. I’m’ thinking it was a baby alligator ’Ol MacDonald flushed down the sewer and one of Dan’s cows ate it and…sorry. Later, the cow goes into labor and the calf gets stuck between cowhole and freedom. The scene where Dan and a young couple on the run found squatting near his property assist the delivery process is one of the ickiest horror scenes ever scene. It’s almost enough to make you swear off juicy cow burgers and baby alligators.

Isolation

The newborn abomination, horribly disfigured by science, makes with the biting, which results in a nail gun defense strategy. Dan is the opposite of happy. He expresses this to the doctor who is wrecking his burger factories. But science cannot be denied, nor can the parasitic embryos still alive in the dead cows.

Isolation

As in The Thing (1982), it’s determined that no one can leave the farm, as the science cow is loaded with infectious what-nots and has the distinct probability of destroying humanity, vegetarians included. While you never get to see science cow in all its inside-out glory, this thing seems to be all teeth, causing udder, uh, utter chaos as it goes on the attack.

Isolation

It should be stated that crawling under the floorboards of a barn where cows turn hay into Texas pancakes is disgusting beyond belief, yet necessary for one’s survival. Only one makes it out alive. Who was it — the cow, the doctor, Dan, the squatter guy who knocked up his girlfriend after the cow bit him? The knocked up girlfriend? I’d crawl under a wet, infected barn before I ever told you.

Sucking Goats on a Budget

Posted in Nature Gone Wild, Science Fiction with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 7, 2015 by Drinkin' & Drive-in

Legend of the Chupacabra

Should’ve turned off the TV after they open with “This film is dedicated to all those who lost their lives during the production of this documentary.” It’d should read “wasted their lives.”

In the pocket change budgeted Legend of the Chupacabra (2000), a chick zoology student videotapes something paranormal turning her uncle’s goats into barn ravioli. Enlisting the help of additional meals, uh, students, she also teams up with an ex-Marine (what, the Navy not good enough for you?), and goes after documenting the alleged Chupacabra.

Legend of the Chupacabra

Since we’re all gonna have to learn how to speak Spanish sooner or later, “Chupracabra” is Latino for “goat sucker.” (The sucking part, quite thankfully, refers to the blood extraction process.)

Legend of the Chupacabra

They find El Suckero, and it turns out to be human-sized and looking suspiciously like a rubber costume. How embarrassing for him/her. By banging the camera around, they make it hard to focus on the creature’s zipper. Trapped in a passenger van, Chupie pounds on the door and rocks the vehicle while everyone screams. (He does that often, just to get a rise out of ’em.)

A few die, everyone else yawns. I’m as yet undecided on which side I’d rather be on after enduring this suckfest.