Death Trees

Forest of Death

A forest in Japan is a popular place to go for a picnic, do some sight-seeing, hiking, and committing suicide. A television crew reports on the woods, sensationalizing the “do-it-yourself” killings by implying the forest is haunted. It is, but that’s beside the point.

Elsewhere, a gorgeous detective (female – I should’ve clarified) is hot on the trail of a guy whom she believes raped and murdered a girl in that very same tree compound.

Forest of Death

With no physical evidence she can’t prove the crime and therefore must let the smug thug run wild and free. That is, until a botanist discovers plants can not only communicate, but are capable of recording emotions. And tree-huggers the world over rejoice.

Re-enacting the crime before a crowd of reporters, machines with wires are hooked up to the surrounding flora and the experiment begins. Nothing happens. The criminal starts laughing so hard he triggers an emotional response within the trees. Leaves fall and when they touch you, give flashbacks of the crime as if videotaped. The killer has no choice but to confess. But it’s not over yet.

Forest of Death

The forest experiences earthquakes and mysterious mist that spews forth fog ghosts with red glowing eyes. We’re told that the spirits won’t harm anyone who wants to live, but that they’re curious over anyone who comes there to take their life. (A search of the forest yields dozens of bodies, pretty much dead.)

Forest of Death (2007) goes on to explain there are forests of death (hence the movie’s title) such as this all over the world, and that thousands go missing in them each year. Fine by me. I’d rather stay inside and not get emotion leaves all over my shirt.

Forest of Death

P.S. Just so you don’t go getting any ideas, there is a real “forest of death” in Japan, called Aokigahara. The woods have a historic association with demons in Japanese mythology and is a popular place for suicides. So, like, don’t go there and do that.

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