Mutant Grub Worms

HuHu AttackGrubs, or “Grub Worms,” are the scourge of lawn freaks and golf courses everywhere. Those little one-inch cream colored beetles with brown head capsules feast on the dinner salad that is the roots of your grass and other eco-friendly plant forms that may or may not be served as an appetizer in fancy pants restaurants. (I’m looking in your direction, dandelions.) And that they have three pair of legs – one on each of the first three segments behind the head – means they can dine ’n dash before you get a chance to squash ’em like sauteed mushrooms in a purified butter sauce.

So yeah, grub worms = not cool. Better, though, to deal with the small ones and not that giant grub worms in the very Japanese sounding but made in New Zealand horror film short, HuHu Attack. As reported by Undead Backbrain (one of the best underground horror sites in the matrix), HuHu Attack is “an audacious 1950s-style comedy-horror musical extravaganza, featuring a spectacular score performed by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra.”

I like the New Zealand Orchestra – they dress nice. And they have a woodwind section to die for.

HuHu AttackHuHu Attack takes place in “Cold War-era rural New Zealand, where two social misfits – a mousy spinster and a traveling magician – find love against a backdrop of small-town prejudice and 40ft-high mutant man-eating Huhu grubs.”

Forty-foot high mutant cannibal grubs works as either a plus or minus for NZ’s tourism council. It’s all in how you spin it.

HuHu AttackI’m not a fan of musicals (too much singing, not enough screaming), but HuHu Attack, even with its playground ridicule inviting name, sounds like a good way to keep your couch company. And don’t let the fact that the grubs look a lot like Mothra in its larval stage (think giant turd). Even though there are more than 100 species of those gummi grubs, they all look the same. Kinda like peanuts, but only if peanuts ate your face and grew to be 40-feet tall. Then peanut butter would way more expensive and…

I’ll shut up now.

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